Brazil is a better team than you think.

Admittedly, it hasn’t felt like Brazil has played all that well this World Cup. The referee seemingly made its two-goal victory over Croatia a more relaxed finish than it should have been; against Mexico, the fourth-place team from CONCACAF, it only managed a draw; and Cameroon was just low-hanging fruit. The host team then took a lot of flak for its play in the Round of 16 against Chile, especially for its performance after halftime. Indeed, Brazil conceded a silly goal on a defensive giveaway, and Chile had chances to win that game.

But I’m here to tell you that Brazil has played better that it has looked. Too often, it seems, the scorelines heavily influence our praise and criticism of what’s happening on the field.

Brazil dominated Group A in terms of Expected Goal Differential (xGD), and recorded the second-highest tally of any team during the group stage. Brazil’s 1.05 xGD during even (tied) gamestates ranked fifth among the 32 teams. You might have expected better from the hosts, but most teams only played about 130 minutes in such gamestates. That’s a big enough sample size to get a general idea of which are the best teams, but too small a sample to split hairs over the top five.

Croatia – June 12th

Against the Croats, a penalty awarded to Fred on what appeared to be a dive marred what was actually a solid performance by Brazil. Up to that controversial call, Brazil had earned 1.4 Expected Goals (xGoals) to Croatia’s 0.4, dominating in quantity and quality of shots. Even after taking the lead on the penalty, Brazil still edged Croatia in xGoals the rest of the way, 0.30 to 0.24—a differential that matches what we’d expect of teams that were leading in this tournament.

Mexico – June 17th

Mexico is a better team than their last-second World Cup qualification (and that commentator) would suggest. It led the CONCACAF Hexagonal (the Hex!) in shot ratios and is currently ranked 13th in the world in the Soccer Power Index (though some of that improved ranking is because of their tie against Brazil). Despite a disappointing 0 – 0 tie on the scoreboard, Brazil’s 1.4 xGoals again dwarfed that of its opponents. Mexico totaled just 0.5 xGoals.

Cameroon – June 23rd

There’s not much to say about this one. Brazil’s 1.9 xGD against Cameroon was the third highest discrepancy thus far in the tournament, trailing only France’s drubbing of Honduras and Germany’s handling of Portugal. It should be noted that both France and Germany enjoyed a man advantage for the majorities of those games.

Chile – June 28th

For Chile, the scoreboard and their well-developed rapport with the woodwork are clear indications that they could have won this game. However, the opportunity creation department informs us that Brazil probably should have won, as it did. 94 percent of this game’s shots were taken during an even gamestate, either 0 – 0 or 1 – 1, and Brazil outpaced Chile during that time by a full expected goal. Even after halftime, when Brazil looked disorganized and sloppy, it still edged Chile 1.1-to-0.7 in xGoals.

 

Perhaps Brazil has not “looked” the part of tournament favorites during its first four games, but its shot creation numbers suggest it is definitely playing like one of the best teams. Add that to their pre-tournament resume, throw in the home-field advantage that’s not going away anytime soon, and there is little doubt that Brazil is still the favorite to win this World Cup—maybe not with a majority of the probability, but definitely with a plurality.